How to Build Custom Ethernet Cables

What do you do when you need three short network Ethernet cables and you only have one laying around? How do you decide when you can buy cat 6 cables bulk for the price of a few small Cat5e cables? What can you do to get the most out of your materials and your Internet?

The answer is that you can easily cut and customize Ethernet cables to suit all of your around-the-house needs. Whether you just need a short clip to set up a router or you’re wiring your dream gaming station, cables are easy to measure and make yourself with the right tools.

All you’ll need:

  • Wire cutters/strippers/crimpers
  • RJ45 plugs — as many as you need
  • Network cable — you can cut a preexisting cable into smaller pieces, or get up to a 1000 ft Ethernet cable in bulk

First, simply measure the cable a few inches longer than you need it to be (to allow room to attach the data plugs) and cut.

Then, strip an inch of coating off either end of the cable and unravel the exposed wiring.

Order the wires by color. From top to bottom: orange/white, orange, green/white, blue, blue/white, green, brown/white, brown.

Trim the wires to length and arrange them into the RJ45 plugs.

Crimp everything into place and you’re good to go!

Building your own Ethernet cables is a great way to have a little fun with wiring and save some money, too. Quality-built Cat5 cables will easily last five to ten years, and RJ45 plugs can be inserted and unplugged 1,000 to 2,000 times before ever falling loose.

The speed of your connection, however, is all going to depend on the type of cable you choose from the start. A Cat5e Ethernet cable has a 100MHz frequency capacity and speeds of 10/100/1000Mbps, while a 6 or 6a can offer significantly more for only slightly more money. If you’re going to cut your own cables anyway, buying Cat6 cables bulk is a great way to ensure top speed and quality throughout all of your network setups. With only a few tools and the proper know-how, you can get everything you need for all of your Ethernet needs.

Myths and Facts about Cell Phone Accessories

Are your USB cables and chargers posing a fire hazard to your home? Is your cell phone covered in germs? Is your mobile device putting you at risk for radiation exposure?

Every day, it seems like there’s some new health or safety concern we should be worried about with our cell phones and electronic devices. The Internet loves spreading rumors, especially when it comes to the things we hold so near and dear like our cell phone accessories. While you should always keep safety in mind when it comes to electronic devices, it’s time to suss out the myths from the facts. Learn which stories are true and which ones might just be pure fabrication.

Rumor: Charger cables are a dangerous fire hazard.
Verdict: True. In 2008, there were a reported 500 deaths and 1,400 injuries as a result of electrical fires. Damaged or frayed cables caused 53,600 home fires and as much as $1.4 billion in property damage. Be sure to frequently inspect cell phone cables for wear and tear and always use a power strip surge protector for plugging in multiple devices. Accidents can be avoided with a little common sense.

Rumor: Your cell phone is dirtier than a toilet seat.
Verdict: True. With 25,000 germs on every square inch of surface, your cell phone is likely dirtier than a toilet seat, the bottom of your shoe, or your pet’s food dish. You can clean your cell phone and cell phone accessories every once in a while with a simple alcohol antiseptic wipe found in any drugstore — no fancy gadgets required. And with that many germs, you really might want to pick one up on your way home.

Rumor: Cell phone radiation causes brain cancer.
Verdict: Probably false. A recent study from the University of Sydney, Australia, found no correlation between the rate of brain cancer and the prevalence of cell phones over the past 30 years. While your smartphone might only have a lifespan of two years, it’s not likely to shorten your own.

As something we all use every day, our cell phones are practically an extension of our bodies. That means taking good care of your devices and cables is worthwhile. Like any electronic tool or device, be sure to play safe with all your cell phone accessories.

Don’t Be Fooled By These 5 Myths About iPhone Chargers

We hear a lot of things about the dangers of cell phones and cell phone accessories from people who don’t know much about electronics and technology. But what bits of advice are actually valid? Bulk USB cables, lightning cables, general cell phone cables — how much do you really know about tech safety and maintenance?

5 Myths About iPhone Charging

  • Using a Non-Apple Charger is Dangerous. They say that charging your iPhone with non-Apple brand cell phone cables can damage your device. This is only half true. If your charger is from a trusted company and is labeled “Made for iPhone/iPad,” then you are totally safe. Just avoid using cheap knockoff cables and chargers as oftentimes they are less expensive due to a lack of safety mechanisms in the internal circuitry. It is because of products like these that you hear about iPhone batteries exploding and phones spontaneously combusting.
  • Do Not Use Your Phone While Charging Do Not Use Your Phone While Charging This myth came from one isolated incident in which an iPhone user’s device exploded. The truth is that the user was using a knockoff charger, which caused the damage to the phone. The act of charging and using a phone at the same time is not inherently dangerous.
  • Do Not Charge Your Phone Overnight. Many of us keep our phones plugged in over night in order to wake up to a fully charged device. This does not damage the phone. Your smartphone is, in fact, smart enough to stop taking in energy from the power source once it is fully charged. Your phone can remain plugged in even when it is no longer receiving a charge.
  • You Can’t Use an iPad Charger on an iPhone. Actually, you can charge an iPhone 6 in half the time when you use a 12-watt iPad charger as opposed to the five-watt charger that comes with your phone.
  • You Never Need to Turn Off Your iPhone. This actually is not true. Most of us never turn off our phones, and while this isn’t the worst thing in the world, it isn’t helping your phone’s battery at all. According to Apple Geniuses, turning off your phone from time to time can help to improve battery life.
  • Damaged and frayed cables can pose a fire hazard. In fact, as many as 53,600 home fires were started in 2008 as a result of electrical failures or malfunctions. That is why cable maintenance is so important. Smartphones generally have a lifespan of about two years, but this can be cut short by failing to take proper care of your cell phone cables.

    5 Things to Know About Cat5e Cables

    Before there were Cat6 Ethernet cables, Cat5e cables were the top-of-the-line when it came to network Ethernet cables. The Cat5e cables were an improvement upon the standard CAT5 cables at the time but are very similar in design and makeup. One of the best things about these type of cables is their strength and durability. Cat5e cables constructed of top grade materials can be expected to last five to 10 years, just like the Cat5’s.

    While man people are familiar with the many different uses for these handy networking cables, you may not know much more about the details behind them. For instance, you may know that Cat5e cables can be used for networks and multi-line phone systems, but did you know they a maximum frequency of 100 MHz and can transmit up to 10/100/1000Mbps? The newer Cat6 cables are just ahead in frequency at 250 MHz.
    Here are a few other aspects of the Cat5e cable.

  • Basics: As mentioned above, the Cat5e cable is a twisted pair cable for carrying signals. The most common use for this type of cable is plugging a computer or laptop into a router/modem to carry internet connections.
  • Typically Unshielded: Most of the time, these kinds of cables do not utilize electromagnetic shielding and instead rely on the balanced line twisted pair design and differential signaling for noise rejection.
  • Cable Segment Length: While the actual length of the cable cord can vary, the maximum length for a cable segment is 100 m per TIA/EIA 568-5-A. Any longer than that and you will need to need to use something like a switch or repeater to ensure a quality connection.
  • Crosstalk: The amount of crosstalk is one of the primary differences between Cat5 and Cat5e cables. New specifications were implemented in these newer cables that improve the quality slightly, but the fact of the matter is many high-quality Cat5 cables could pass for their higher ‘e’ standard if they were properly certified as such.
  • Insulation, Conductors and Twist Length: Usually, these kinds of Ethernet cables are insulated with PVC or LSOH material. The standard for conductors is currently set between 22 American Wire Gauge (AWG) and no thinner than 24 AWG (26 for some shorter cables)
  • Ethernet cables are some of the most prevalent and useful ways to network various devices, and the CAT5e is one of the higher end choices you can go with.

    The Last Minute Father’s Day Gift Guide

    Father’s Day is coming up this weekend, have you already got a gift for your pops? If not, CableWholesale is here to help! We have compiled a list of some of the most popular items for Father’s Day this year, that you can still pick up in a pinch. Don’t get stuck buying dad another tie. This year is different. You still have three shopping days left!

    1. If your Pa is going to be an office warrior this summer, get him a nice USB fan for his desk. Keep him cool while he works through the summer. It’s portable too, just add batteries! $11.88

    2. If your pop still likes to dress like a cool guy, then pick him up a brand-new pair of Converse. The Chuck Taylor II line has been redesigned with the aging rocker in mind. The new shoes have been rebuilt with better cushioning and they added some much-needed arch support. This way dad will be able to walk and stand for longer periods of time while looking cool without having to pay the price with achy feet. $75

    3. Solar Power Bank – 2 USB Port: If your dad is the outdoorsy type, chances are that he needs a portable USB charger. Go the extra mile and pick him a solar- power charger, so he can charge his smartphone and other devices by sunlight. Perfect for backpacking, camping and beach trips! $35.19

    4. Philips Sonicare 2 Series Sonic Electric Rechargeable Toothbrush: Caring for you teeth is always important, so get dad a fancy toothbrush that will do the work for him. $69.99

    5. iRobot Roomba 870 Vacuum Cleaning Robot: Vacuuming is a hassle. That is why the is so popular, it literally does the work for you. Take an item off of pop’s list of chores with this vacuuming robot. $599.99 https://www.amazon.com/iRobot-Roomba-Vacuum-Cleaning-Robot/dp/B00LKQBHVO

    6. Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker: Give pops the freedom of listening to music wherever he pleases with our handy bluetooth speaker. He can bring it out to the pool or use it at the beach; our speaker is water friendly.

    7. iBobber Wireless Bluetooth Smart Fish Finder: If your Dad is a fisherman, than this is the coolest Father’s Day gift you could get him. Using sonar technology, the iBobber will identify where fish are underwater, without any guesswork. The sonar readings are accurate down to a depth of 135′. Comes with a complimentary app to download. Works with iOS or Android. $89.99

    8. If your dad is a runner or gym enthusiast, pick him up some sport clip earphones! That way he won’t miss a beat while being active and not have to deal with ear buds falling out. $14.97

    3 Reasons to Invest in a Quality HDMI Cable

    In our ever-evolving world of technology, products are constantly being made in supposed efforts to make life easier and more convenient for people. In the world of cables, traditional network Ethernet cables became CAT5 cables, which eventually evolved into CAT6 cables with more data frequency. USB cables are now on their third generation of models. One of the other most popular of cables is high-speed HDMI cables.

    HDMI cables have quickly become one of today’s must-have products for any modern household/workplace. One of the greatest features of HDMI is that the length of the cord doesn’t matter much when it comes to audio and video. Unless you’re connecting devices over 100 feet away, 100 ft HDMI cables will efficiently connect devices.
    Here are three reasons why having a 100 ft HDMI cable around will likely be a wise investment going forward.

    Netflix Binges: Netflix, or some other similar streaming service, has quickly become the pastime of choice for a plethora of Millennials. Watching on a laptop curled up in a bed is great, but sometimes you want to be able to enjoy the experience on a bigger screen or with multiple other people. That’s where 100 ft HDMI cables can come in handy. You can easily connect your laptop to most new televisions for easy viewing and Netflix binging.

    Video Gaming: Watching movies and shows isn’t the only way to take advantage of these cables. The hardcore gamers know all too well how awesome hooking up a computer/laptop to a big-screen monitor can be for ultimate gaming experience. This can even be done from a room over without even having to move your entire modem with a 100 ft HDMI cable.

    Presentations: For those looking for more professional uses, HDMI cables are a convenient and easy way to hook up a laptop with an important business presentation without having to worry about transferring files, using a different operating system, or any other potential problem that can arise when saving files to a jump drive or sending via email.

    Manufacturers and advertisers will have you believe that HDMI cables will cost $50 or more, but that’s just fallacy. You can find a standard three-foot HDMI cable at CableWholesale for just over five dollars. It’s true, a 100 ft HDMI cable will run you over $50, but if you don’t need that much length, shorter options are available for a fraction of the price.

    5 Things to Know About Cat5e Cables

    Before there were Cat6 Ethernet cables, Cat5e cables were the top-of-the-line when it came to network Ethernet cables. The Cat5e cables were an improvement upon the standard CAT5 cables at the time but are very similar in design and makeup. One of the best things about these type of cables is their strength and durability. Cat5e cables constructed of top grade materials can be expected to last five to 10 years, just like the Cat5’s.

    While man people are familiar with the many different uses for these handy networking cables, you may not know much more about the details behind them. For instance, you may know that Cat5e cables can be used for networks and multi-line phone systems, but did you know they a maximum frequency of 100 MHz and can transmit up to 10/100/1000Mbps? The newer Cat6 cables are just ahead in frequency at 250 MHz.
    Here are a few other aspects of the Cat5e cable.

      Basics
      As mentioned above, the Cat5e cable is a twisted pair cable for carrying signals. The most common use for this type of cable is plugging a computer or laptop into a router/modem to carry internet connections.

      Typically Unshielded
      Most of the time, these kinds of cables do not utilize electromagnetic shielding and instead rely on the balanced line twisted pair design and differential signaling for noise rejection.

      Cable Segment Length
      While the actual length of the cable cord can vary, the maximum length for a cable segment is 100 m per TIA/EIA 568-5-A. Any longer than that and you will need to need to use something like a switch or repeater to ensure a quality connection.

      Crosstalk
      The amount of crosstalk is one of the primary differences between Cat5 and Cat5e cables. New specifications were implemented in these newer cables that improve the quality slightly, but the fact of the matter is many high-quality Cat5 cables could pass for their higher ‘e’ standard if they were properly certified as such.

      Insulation, Conductors and Twist Length
      Usually, these kinds of Ethernet cables are insulated with PVC or LSOH material. The standard for conductors is currently set between 22 American Wire Gauge (AWG) and no thinner than 24 AWG (26 for some shorter cables).

      Ethernet cables are some of the most prevalent and useful ways to network various devices, and the CAT5e is one of the higher end choices you can go with.

    FAQ About HDMI Cables

    Are you confused by the variety in types of AV equipment? Maybe you are trying to hook up your Blu-ray player to your television, but there are just too many cords, wires, plugs, and pieces. You’re not alone. Below you will find some answers to frequently asked questions about HDMI cables.

    What exactly do high-speed HDMI cables do?

    High-speed HDMI cables are the standard connection for audio/video devices. An HDMI cable will carry both the audio and video signals from your device to your display. Similar to USB cables, they just simply plug in. HDMI cables transmit encrypted, uncompressed digital video and audio from one source (Blu-ray, computer, or HD cable box) to a high definition monitor.

    What length HDMI cable do I need?

    The length of the cable is not relevant when it comes to the quality of the audio and video. The only instance in which the length of the cable matters is when you are working with a great distance. If you need a cable that is 100 feet or longer, it is wise to invest in an HDMI cable specifically designed for that purpose.

    What types of HDMI cables are there?

    There are three types of HDMI cables: HDMI Standard, HDMI Standard with Ethernet, and HDMI Standard Automotive.

    Are HDMI cables expensive?

    It’s a common myth that HDMI cables are expensive. While stores can charge a great deal of money for a single HDMI cable, you should not feel obligated to pay that asking price.

    What is the difference between an HDMI cable and a DVI cable?

    The biggest difference between the two input-output media interfaces is in their layouts. A DVI cable is usually bigger in size while an HDMI is more compact and resembles a USB cable. Another major difference is in capability: the HDMI supports audio and video, whereas the DVI is strictly video-only.

    Should I get an HDMI or a DVI cable?

    This will depend on what inputs your tech has. HDMI is more common so the cable is likely to fit just about any modern laptop, monitor, or game console. However, if you are trying to connect a laptop to a monitor and one requires HDMI while the other can only connect with DVI, there is a solution. Adapters are available to connect the two, as are special cables known as HDMI to DVI cables.

    If you have any additional questions regarding HDMI and DVI cables or other AV interfaces, leave them in the comments section below.

    faq_hdmi.jpg

    Varieties of Fiber Optic Cable

    Fiber optics. You’ve probably heard the term on a television commercial or in relation to a broadcast/communications carrier in some capacity, but did you know there are actually different varieties and specifications of fiber optic cables?

    For example, standard commercial uses of fiber optic cables can transmit 10 to 80 Gigabits per second over just one channel. The current record for transmission speed is 15.5 Terabits per second over a distance of 7,000km, according to reports. For a clearer perspective, that’s the equivalent of 10.3 million DSL connections.

    Another version of fiber optic cabling is known as Ethernet fiber converters. Copper-based Ethernet cables, such as CAT5E and CAT6, only have a maximum distance of 328 feet, but with an Ethernet fiber
    converter, they have the potential of up to 1.2 miles.

    Most fiber optic cables use two fibers, but there are also Single Mode cables. Single Mode cables contain a single strand of glass fiber with a diameter of 8.3 to 10 microns and have one mode of transmission. Single Mode Fiber have a relatively narrow diameter, through which only one mode will propagate typically 1310 or 1550nm.

    Single Mode fiber is typically used in applications where data is sent at multi-frequency, such as WDM (Wave-Division-Multiplexing), so that only one cable is required. Single Mode is a bit more expensive, but it also transmits data faster and up to 50 times farther than Multi-mode.

    That being said, Multi-mode fiber does have its uses. Multi-mode cables have a bigger diameter, which is usually in the 50 to 100 micron range for the light carry component (in the U.S. the most common size is 62.5um). Multi-mode fiber gives you high bandwidth at high speeds (10 to 100MBS – Gigabit to 275m to 2km) over medium distances. Two fibers are typically used in applications where Multi-mode fiber is used.

    Warning Signs That You Need to Replace Your Phone or Charging Cables

    Smartphones don’t last forever; research shows the typical smartphone lasts for about two years. Over time, wear, tear, muck and grime takes its toll on your mobile device, causing it to lose functionality. In fact, every square inch of your phone carries about 25,000 germs, making it dirtier than the bottom of your shoe or even your toilet seat.

    When your phone and cell phone cables reach the end of their lives, they can pose serious health and safety risks. For instance, damaged and frayed phone charging cables can be a fire hazard. In 2008, electrical failures and malfunctions resulted in approximately 53,600 home fires that caused over 500 deaths.

    So, how do you know if your smartphone, phone cables, or USB cables are reaching the end of their lifespans? Keep an eye out for the following warning signs.

    Warning Signs That Your Phone or USB Cables are Dying

      Warm to the touch: Your phone’s rechargeable battery will inevitably get warmer as it charges; however, it should be able to internalize the heat, keeping it from feeling noticeably hot. If your smartphone does begin to feel hot, it may need a new battery.

      Unresponsive buttons: If the external buttons on your smartphone stop working or are severely lagging, you definitely have a problem. This may be a malfunction in the phone itself or in the charging device.

      Fraying: Do you see obvious damage to the USB cable? If you notice that the cord is bent or fraying, it is probably time to replace it. Damage is not always visible, though, so try plugging the cable into a USB port on a computer rather than using the wall adapter to determine the source of the problem.

    Whether it be your smartphones, bulk USB cables, tablet, USB 3 cables, e-reader, or what-have-you, you need to replace your electronics every now and then. Overused devices and cables can be dangerous if you are not careful.

    If you have any questions about the lifespan of a phone or getting bulk USB cables to replace what you have, feel free to share in the comments.